Chronicles of Boone County

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the_development_of_tourism_at_big_bone [2014/05/02 10:14]
hdelaney
the_development_of_tourism_at_big_bone [2015/04/22 12:41] (current)
jgregory
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  {{ http://​bcplfusion.bcpl.org/​Repository/​bigbone_eastbend_hamilton029.jpg?​250|Bath house at Big Bone Springs, circa 1900}}  {{ http://​bcplfusion.bcpl.org/​Repository/​bigbone_eastbend_hamilton029.jpg?​250|Bath house at Big Bone Springs, circa 1900}}
  
-The mineral-rich sulfur springs also became a great draw to Big Bone Lick.  The need for a hotel was met when the Clay House opened circa 1815.  As the [[big_bone_springs|springs]] gained notoriety, the resort’s popularity grew.  Guests came to relax, bathe, and drink the beneficial waters of the springs, and to view the ancient fossils. ​ Sadly, fire destroyed the hotel in 1845.+The mineral-rich sulfur springs also became a great draw to Big Bone Lick.  The need for a hotel was met when the Clay House opened circa [[1815]].  As the [[big_bone_springs|springs]] gained notoriety, the resort’s popularity grew.  Guests came to relax, bathe, and drink the beneficial waters of the springs, and to view the ancient fossils. ​ Sadly, fire destroyed the hotel in [[1845]].
  
 Though the Clay House was gone, the springs remained. ​ The water was bottled, advertised in newspapers, and distributed by dealers throughout the area.  In addition to sodium, the spring water contained sulfur, limestone, magnesium and other minerals. ​ Cincinnati physician, Dr. Daniel Drake, described the odor of the mineral waters as “sulpherous (sic) and offensive to strangers”,​ but acknowledged its healing qualities. ​  His recommendation was to drink up to a gallon each day. Though the Clay House was gone, the springs remained. ​ The water was bottled, advertised in newspapers, and distributed by dealers throughout the area.  In addition to sodium, the spring water contained sulfur, limestone, magnesium and other minerals. ​ Cincinnati physician, Dr. Daniel Drake, described the odor of the mineral waters as “sulpherous (sic) and offensive to strangers”,​ but acknowledged its healing qualities. ​  His recommendation was to drink up to a gallon each day.
  
- Reports of the era advertised the improvement of numerous medical conditions, including: ​ gout, constipation,​ eczema, and rheumatism, and others. ​ The popularity of resorts with mineral springs grew throughout the country. ​  A trip to “take the waters” became quite trendy in the late 19th and early 20th century. ​  +Reports of the era advertised the improvement of numerous medical conditions, including: ​ gout, constipation,​ eczema, and rheumatism, and others. ​ The popularity of resorts with mineral springs grew throughout the country. ​  A trip to “take the waters” became quite trendy in the late 19th and early 20th century. ​  
-After the Clay House burned, the property near the springs remained quite valuable, but a hotel was not built until after the Civil War. Newspaper accounts of 1860s mention the springs, but a hotel is not named. +After the Clay House burned, the property near the springs remained quite valuable, but a hotel was not built until after the Civil War. Newspaper accounts of [[1860s]] mention the springs, but a hotel is not named. 
-In 1876 a new “Clay House” opened, with numerous guest rooms, bath houses and an open pavilion. The hotel changed hands several times, and was damaged by a tornado in 1895. Other guest houses, like Dr. Stevenson’s “Valley Hotel” were also the site of healing and recreation.+In [[1876]] a new “Clay House” opened, with numerous guest rooms, bath houses and an open pavilion. The hotel changed hands several times, and was damaged by a tornado in 1895. Other guest houses, like Dr. Stevenson’s “Valley Hotel” were also the site of healing and recreation.
  
-As the world began to change, the resort lost popularity. ​  A writer for the Louisville Courier Journal in 1912 describes the Clay House resort as “deserted”,​ though mention of any other hotel is absent. ​ After WWII, the Clay House was dismantled. ​ Though the springs are no longer a destination,​ the fossils still fascinate visitors. ​ Big Bone Lick State Park, established in 1960, now offers a unique destination for travelers.+As the world began to change, the resort lost popularity. ​  A writer for the Louisville Courier Journal in 1912 describes the Clay House resort as “deserted”,​ though mention of any other hotel is absent. ​ After WWII, the Clay House was dismantled. ​ Though the springs are no longer a destination,​ the fossils still fascinate visitors.  ​[[Big Bone Lick State Park]], established in 1960, now offers a unique destination for travelers.
  
  
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   * Town of [[big_bone|Big Bone]]   * Town of [[big_bone|Big Bone]]
   * [[big_bone_lick|Big Bone Lick]]   * [[big_bone_lick|Big Bone Lick]]
 +  * [[Big Bone Lick State Park]]
   * [[Articles of Interest]]   * [[Articles of Interest]]
  
the_development_of_tourism_at_big_bone.1399040089.txt.gz · Last modified: 2014/05/02 10:14 by hdelaney