We can help you find your ancestors

When most people think of BCPL’s Local History Department, they think that there are only resources for researchers of Boone County history. In reality, the Local History (and Genealogy) Department serves the family research needs of anyone who emails, calls, writes or stops by. It is true that the majority of our microfilm and family files focus on Boone County, and the book collection emphasizes the genealogical history of the region. However, BCPL’s online genealogy databases are appropriate regardless of where your family is from- the United States, Canada, Europe or even, South America.

Ancestry Library Edition, the library version of Ancestry.com, offers a wide range of information to the family history researcher without the cost of a personal subscription. This database is a great resource for anyone starting their genealogy research. Not only do you get access to a wide variety of records including: census; birth/marriage/death; military; directories; and user-submitted family trees, Ancestry also offers free downloadable research forms and a Learning Center with Research Guides and How-To videos from leading genealogists. This database can only be accessed inside the Library, but it is available on all public computers at all six library locations.

Heritage Quest is a great database for the extra tidbits of information sought after by more experienced researchers. Used as a companion to Ancestry, Heritage Quest offers digitized Revolutionary War records, full text family histories, an index of genealogical and historical society newsletters and journals and Freeman’s Bank records (an essential African American heritage resource). This database may be accessed from home with your BCPL library card.

Genealogy Connect is a database of over 570 digitized books and genealogy resources from both Clearfield and Genealogical Publishing. Fully searchable, this database is essential for all genealogy researcher- novice and expert alike. Topics include: American Colonists & the Revolution; Aristocracy; How-To & Reference; Immigration; Native North Americans; and various regional U.S. records. This database may be accessed from home with your BCPL library card.

America’s Genealogy Bank is an American newspaper and document database which spans from 1690 to 1999. Ideally used once a researcher finds a specific ancestor name to focus on, this database will provide newspaper accounts of your early relatives, as well as, congressional records for anyone petitioning for a veteran’s pension. This database may be accessed from home with your BCPL library card.

Regardless of where your family is from, the Local History Department team feels it is important for you find your family roots and connect to your past. You are not alone on this journey! We are available by phone (859)342-2665 x8134 or by email localhistory@bcpl.org. Most importantly, we offer One-On-One appointments with a team member to help you get started, tear down that brick wall, or even to give you feed back to make certain you are following the right trail to your ancestors. It is our pleasure and our commitment to help you with your family history and we look forward to meeting you!

–Bridget

Bridget Striker, graduate of the University of Kentucky, has been with BCPL since 2001 where she uses her background in archaeology, historic preservation and GIS mapping to ferret out elusive bits of Boone County history as the Local History Coordinator. Bridget serves as Vice-Chair of the Boone County Historic Preservation Review Board and Executive Board Member of the Rabbit Hash Historical Society.

Libraries today are about people, not books – part two

Becky Kempf, Public Relations Coordinator
This is part two of a blog post on how the main focus of libraries has changed from books to being primarily about people (read part one here). Libraries today are changing almost as fast as technology. Part of it is because we’ve always been in the business of information and our mission is to provide you with the most accurate, up-to-date information available. This includes keeping up with the latest technology. Library catalogs are no longer on cards in drawers and there aren’t pockets for checkout slips in our books anymore. These days, because of RFD technology, you just scan your books and card at our self-check stations and you are good go!  You can still check out traditional books at Boone County Public Library, but you can also check out eBooks, Nooks, iPads, laptops and video games. You can even download free music and stream videos. (Did you know that some libraries check out fishing poles, cake pans, and tools?)

Library buildings are getting bigger too and if you’ve been in one lately, you know it’s not to hold more books. Libraries are getting bigger to hold more people!  We aren’t just in the business of books and information anymore, we’re in the business of people – of communities. Libraries today look hard at their communities and seek to fill in the gaps. Each library is a little different because they reflect the needs and wants of the people in their community. That’s what we do at Boone County Public Library, we look at what you want and try to provide it for you, whether it is answers to questions, resume-writing help or even fishing poles!  I asked some of my co-workers why they like working at the Library – what keeps them coming back day after day. If you‘ve been following this blog, you know that all of their answers lead back to people – serving people – serving you!

Shaun Davidson, Adult Programmer
I love that the Library brings people together to experience activities and events that are unique to Boone County. There is truly always something going on! I especially enjoy our free concert series, which is one of the very few places, if not the ONLY place in the county, to hear high caliber live music in styles ranging from classical to bluegrass. 

Jasbir Chahal, Branch Manager, Florence Branch
I love working at the Library because I find helping people very satisfying and rewarding. When a  customer walks in the door with a confused and scared look because he has been told that the only way he can apply for a job is online and he has no idea how to do it – we help him. We sit down and walk through the job application process together. Then when he comes back in, a few weeks or months later, and tells us he got the job – it makes it all worthwhile.

Another example –A veteran visited our branch and he was down, physically and mentally. We provided a little TLC and told him about agencies that could help him. The customer returned a year later and told us that he got the help he needed at the VA hospital and now has a job and an apartment. He just stopped by to say “Thank you.”

I remember one time, a young man stopped by the branch and asked to see me. As he talked, I kept trying to figure out where I knew him from. He told me that he had just returned from an international conference where he had the opportunity to present his project. He just wanted to let me know that he achieved this goal because of his love of reading. When I apologized for not recognizing him, I was touched to hear him say: “Don’t worry, I have grown up since you last saw me, but you know what, I will never forget your voice.” This young man was in my preschool story time some 20 or so years ago. When just doing your job impacts lives it is hard to not love it.

Candace Clarke and Carol Freytag, Youth Services – Outreach
Candace and Carol visit local preschools, daycares and communities with the library bus (Community Center on Wheels).

Carol: I work with small children and I like to ask them funny questions to hear their funny answers. They have a different view of the world than adults do. This is my favorite part of the job – talking to the children.  I remember one day when we were out, there was a boy checking out 25 books with his library card. His friend was amazed that he could check out so many books with his card and he said, “That card is power!” The outreach part of the job is so rewarding. We bring families things that they might otherwise not be exposed to.

Candace: There is an exchange happening – it’s not just us bringing stuff to the kids, they are giving back to us, too. We share in their excitements and disappointments – their joys and their sorrows. One day there will be a child so excited to be off of school for a day and then another child sharing how his father died six months ago and he’s still sad about it.

Carol: The children become comfortable with us, we develop a relationship. We try to be another positive influence in their lives. It’s rewarding that they trust us, we are usually at each stop once a month.

Candace: We are something different and exciting that the kids can count on. I wish I could be out all day long with the kids. I enjoy being out in the community. I like to talk to people and get to know them.  I meet people where they go to school, where they do business and where they relax. I like getting to know them better and hearing what’s important to them.

I really like it when several generations visit the bus at one time. The older generation will say they remember visiting a bookmobile when they were young and they are so glad that we are here for their kids and grandkids. It validates what we are doing to hear that we are important to them and that the service we provide enriches their lives.

Back to Becky
Yes, we still have books in the Library, but today books are just one of the ways we bring people together. This is your Library, Boone County, tell us how we can better serve you, we are listening.