Chronicles of Boone County

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counterfeiting [2018/07/16 13:52]
kbilz [More Information]
counterfeiting [2019/06/19 10:54] (current)
jgregory [Counterfeiting in Boone County]
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 Counterfeiting was not limited to paper money, there were also faux coins being minted. An article in the Cincinnati Enquirer, Sep 4, [[1889]] tells of a talented counterfeiter named George Williams, who was manufacturing and distributing "bogus silver dollars"​ in Cincinnati. ​ Concerned with being caught, he moved down river to Hamilton Landing, and set up shop with the help of “Maxwell” and a “boy named Cooper”. ​ Williams was given up by the young accomplice, Cooper; he and Maxwell were sent to prison. Counterfeiting was not limited to paper money, there were also faux coins being minted. An article in the Cincinnati Enquirer, Sep 4, [[1889]] tells of a talented counterfeiter named George Williams, who was manufacturing and distributing "bogus silver dollars"​ in Cincinnati. ​ Concerned with being caught, he moved down river to Hamilton Landing, and set up shop with the help of “Maxwell” and a “boy named Cooper”. ​ Williams was given up by the young accomplice, Cooper; he and Maxwell were sent to prison.
  
-In 1906, the [[anderson_ferry|Anderson Ferry’s]] Captain [[kottmyer_family|Kottmyer]] spotted some coins near the bank of the Boone County landing. When he fished them out, he realized that they were not authentic, and turned them over to police. The Cincinnati Enquirer reported that the find was “40 found coins: dollars, half dollars and quarters and a chunk of Babbitt metal” (metal used to make ball bearings).+In 1906, the [[anderson_ferry|Anderson Ferry’s]] Captain [[kottmeyer_family|Kottmyer]] spotted some coins near the bank of the Boone County landing. When he fished them out, he realized that they were not authentic, and turned them over to police. The Cincinnati Enquirer reported that the find was “40 found coins: dollars, half dollars and quarters and a chunk of Babbitt metal” (metal used to make ball bearings).
  
 Counterfeiting gave birth to a scam called “green goods” which took advantage of people’s interest in quick money. ​ Responding to a flyer he had seen, Henry Houston, of Verona, made a trip to New York to purchase some counterfeit bills for 50 cents on the dollar. ​ His ill-gotten gain would fund his dream of owning a stable of racehorses. ​ In May of 1906, the Enquirer tells the tale of how, after turning over $300 of borrowed money, Houston discovers he has purchased six one-dollar bills, each wrapped around a stack of worthless paper. ​ Then, as now, crime doesn’t pay. Counterfeiting gave birth to a scam called “green goods” which took advantage of people’s interest in quick money. ​ Responding to a flyer he had seen, Henry Houston, of Verona, made a trip to New York to purchase some counterfeit bills for 50 cents on the dollar. ​ His ill-gotten gain would fund his dream of owning a stable of racehorses. ​ In May of 1906, the Enquirer tells the tale of how, after turning over $300 of borrowed money, Houston discovers he has purchased six one-dollar bills, each wrapped around a stack of worthless paper. ​ Then, as now, crime doesn’t pay.
counterfeiting.1531763550.txt.gz · Last modified: 2018/07/16 13:52 by kbilz