Chronicles of Boone County

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moving_pictures [2017/10/06 15:53] (current)
hdelaney created
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 +====== Moving Pictures in Boone County ======
 +
 +By: Hillary Delaney
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 +
 +Just after the turn of the century, a new novelty was generating excitement in our area and around the world: movies! ​  The earliest films in this era were educational in nature, the interest mainly was in the technology, rather than the content. In 1906, a high-speed train, loaded with film gear, left Cincinnati for Chattanooga,​ filming the scenery the entire route. ​ Within a few months, the Florence Fair was offering a “moving pictures tent” as one of its attractions,​ and the [[Florence Public School|Florence School]] became a screening room.
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 +There were viewings at the hall in [[Bullittsville]] in 1911, and the “World of Cincinnati” exhibition featured motion pictures as one of its big-draw attractions in 1912.  That same year, some of our citizens along the river may have taken the ferry to Rising Sun and Lawrenceburg,​ both regularly showing moving pictures. ​ Several theaters took a break that year, though, due to outbreaks of small pox, scarlet fever and diphtheria.
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 +As the new century rolled into its “teen years,” moving pictures really began to gain popularity. ​ [[Walton]] was at the forefront, offering a combination of vaudeville acts and moving pictures in 1913 which garnered a big response. ​ Taking note of this were entrepreneurs Roy Stamler and Charles Chambers, who worked as partners and independently to spread the joy of film in the area.  They began with the [[Walton Opera House]], offering two shows per week in the winter months of 1913-1914, an indoor venue with warmth and entertainment.  ​
 +
 +In the spring of 1914, as the weather warmed up, Stamler and [[Chambers family|Chambers]] began to run an outdoor “Airdome” theater, next to the Equitable Bank.  This type of venue was typically covered, but without walls, offering a breeze to the audience. ​ At ten cents per person, they must have been doing a booming business, as Chambers bought a lot for $500 that year, with the aim to build a hall for movies, and Stamler opened both the “Royal” in Walton and the “Duncan” in Falmouth. ​ These venues offered only “high class pictures,​” according to the Boone County Recorder. ​
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 +As the 1920s roared in, the local movie business grew.  Robert [[Berkshire family|Berkshire]] was showing movies in the Universalist Church in Burlington, later turning over the operation to George Porter, who expanded to Petersburg, as well.  The viewers were becoming sophisticated,​ opting for silent film stars Rudy Valentino and Gloria Swanson for 33 cents per ticket over free films like “Farm Bureau Romance” and “The World’s Greatest Livestock and Sires.” ​ Competition only intensified with the addition of sound to film, first seen in the 1927 film “The Jazz Singer.” That’s entertainment. ​
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 +===== More Information =====
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 +
 +=====Related Topics =====
 +
 +  * [[Articles of Interest]]
 +  * [[Towns]]
 +
 +==== Related Websites ====
 +  * A short history of the movie industry at [[http://​historycooperative.org/​the-history-of-the-hollywood-movie-industry/​|historycooperative.org]]
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moving_pictures.txt · Last modified: 2017/10/06 15:53 by hdelaney