Chronicles of Boone County

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silas_dinsmoor_part_4 [2014/08/18 11:17]
hdelaney [Related Topics]
silas_dinsmoor_part_4 [2018/10/01 11:42] (current)
kbilz
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 [[Silas Dinsmoor]] held the position of Choctaw Indian agent from [[1802]] until [[1814]]; he had been Cherokees Indian agent from 1794 until 1799. During his 17-year tenure as government Indian agent he performed his job with fairness, compassion, integrity and dedication, both to his fellow white citizens and his Native American charges. He followed and upheld the laws of the United States in the performance of his duties. Sadly, his policy of never deviating in the enforcement of the law led to his removal from his position, thanks to one Andrew Jackson. [[Silas Dinsmoor]] held the position of Choctaw Indian agent from [[1802]] until [[1814]]; he had been Cherokees Indian agent from 1794 until 1799. During his 17-year tenure as government Indian agent he performed his job with fairness, compassion, integrity and dedication, both to his fellow white citizens and his Native American charges. He followed and upheld the laws of the United States in the performance of his duties. Sadly, his policy of never deviating in the enforcement of the law led to his removal from his position, thanks to one Andrew Jackson.
  
-As mandated by the Secretary of War, anyone traveling through Indian Territory was required to show a passport. ​ If they had any [[African Americans]] traveling with them, they had to show written proof to demonstrate that they were not runaway slaves. Silas began enforcing these laws because escaping slaves were using the Choctaw settlement as a refuge and their owners were complaining. This policy was highly insulting to Andrew Jackson, who felt he was above the law and had no intention of showing a passport or papers for his slaves. It has been speculated that Jackson'​s violent fits of anger toward and about Silas were because he and some of his relatives further down south were involved in the sale and trade of slaves and passed this way regularly.+As mandated by the Secretary of War, anyone traveling through Indian Territory was required to show a passport. ​ If they had any [[African-Americans|African Americans]] traveling with them, they had to show written proof to demonstrate that they were not runaway slaves. Silas began enforcing these laws because escaping slaves were using the Choctaw settlement as a refuge and their owners were complaining. This policy was highly insulting to Andrew Jackson, who felt he was above the law and had no intention of showing a passport or papers for his slaves. It has been speculated that Jackson'​s violent fits of anger toward and about Silas were because he and some of his relatives further down south were involved in the sale and trade of slaves and passed this way regularly.
  
 Silas would not back down from his policy of requiring proper papers to pass and Jackson'​s anger toward him escalated. It was also no secret how Silas felt about Jackson. Finally, in October of [[1812]], Jackson sent a venomous letter to his Tennessee congressman ranting and raving about Silas and demanding his removal from the agency or the people from West Tennessee would burn him and his agency and all his buildings. Silas would not back down from his policy of requiring proper papers to pass and Jackson'​s anger toward him escalated. It was also no secret how Silas felt about Jackson. Finally, in October of [[1812]], Jackson sent a venomous letter to his Tennessee congressman ranting and raving about Silas and demanding his removal from the agency or the people from West Tennessee would burn him and his agency and all his buildings.
silas_dinsmoor_part_4.1408375078.txt.gz · Last modified: 2014/08/18 11:17 by hdelaney