You’re More Creative Than You Think with Creativebug

Creativebug is a digital resource for anyone looking to start a new creative project! This online platform offers a wide variety of step-by-step video classes on several topics such as art, design, sewing, quilting, knitting, crocheting, jewelry, kids’ crafts and so much more! Each class includes in-depth video instructions, as well as downloadable pdf guides and a material list. You can also show-off your finished projects in the Gallery tabs and even chat with other users about specific projects in the Discussion tab.

Just follow these simple steps to get started:

  1. Go to bcpl.org and click the Digital Library link.
  2. Next, scroll down and click the Creativebug link.
  3. Once on the Creativebug site, you can create your new account.
  4. Lastly, search or browse for your next project!

Once you begin a class, you will be able to stop and return to your instruction by logging on to your account, allowing you to create at your own pace. Be sure to also check out the Creativebug blog and the CBTV (Creativebug TV) for even more project ideas. Take your crafting to the next level with the help of Creativebug!

 


 

Written by Emily Sexton
Public Relations Specialist

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch six – Valley of the Dinosaurs

Do you remember waaaaaay back when having a day off meant Saturday, and Saturday meant waking up at the crack of dawn to plop yourself in front of the television set with a bowl of sugar based cereal substitute to watch Saturday morning cartoons? Yeah, me neither. But that’s okay. Let’s get NOSTALGIC

Ah childhood memories. Do you remember that time, on September 7, 1974, when your parents chose to take you on vacation to the jungles of South America instead of something normal, like Disneyland? And how, while white water rafting, a whirlpool sucked your canoe into an inter-dimensional vortex? Good times. You could have stayed home and watched, for the first time, Valley of the Dinosaurs.


History

Valley of the Dinosaurs was one of three similar shows airing in 1974 that involved a modern family interacting with prehistoric humans and dinosaurs, the other two being Land of the Lost and Korg: 70,000 B.C. The cartoon, produced by Hanna-Barbera, ran for 16 episodes from September 7, 1974 to September 4, 1976 and featured the Butler family being sucked into a whirlpool while traversing the rapids in South America only to emerge either “back in time” or “in a parallel fantasy world.” Valley of the Dinosaurs was a “laudatory example of melding entertainment with education” “[without] bombarding the viewer with ‘message’ dialogue or prosocial propaganda.” In other words, a show featuring dinosaurs, early humans, and modern humans all living in the same time period is intended to teach me something. I go into this with some skepticism. 


What I remember

I consider myself something of a connoisseur of cartoons, if not an actual expert, but I can honestly say I’d never heard of Valley of the Dinosaurs prior to doing a search for cartoons that first aired in the 70s-80s, meaning that they would have been age appropriate for my childhood cartoon binging – which is entirely different from my adult cartoon binging.  (Ok… it’s not any different. I can admit that. Happy?)


Rewatch

I think Episode 1 is trying to teach me that if I am ever chased into a cave by a brontosaurus, because one of my traveling companions has violated a local taboo about leaving a variety of fruit for the sole consumption of said brontosaurus, leading to a cave in and rising water levels from an underground spring, I can use bamboo to channel that water through a hole in the ceiling of the cave using basic physics. I also learned the properties of a lever and how to use that lever to create an avalanche to drive away the hangry brontosaurus so that my companions can escape. (Cue: *the more you know*)


Final verdict

Valley of the Dinosaurs reminds me of the Edgar Rice BurroughsPellucidar series where a miner and an inventor use an “iron mole” to drill down into “a world that time forgot” inside of the hollow Earth. Swap out the miner and the inventor for your standard sitcom family, add a couple of pets, a dog and a stegosaurus, for comic relief, and you have Valley of the Dinosaurs. That being said, it’s highly unlikely that most people, unlike myself, will be reminded of a series whose first book was published in 1914. You’ll also have to shut your brain off for the way the “cave people” speak perfect, if stilted, English. It’s like watching the dreadful representations of Native Americans in old Westerns, except that the “cave people” in Valley of the Dinosaurs are basically blue-eyed and Caucasian. 


If you liked Valley of the Dinosaurs

Valley of the Dinosaurs

Land of the Lost

Land of the Lost, the complete series, season three.

Jurassic Park

Dinotopia : a land apart from time by Gurney, James

The Rise And Fall Of The Dinosaurs : A New History Of A Lost World by Stephen Brusatte

Nature’s giants : the biology and evolution of the world’s largest lifeforms by Graeme D. Ruxton

Danny And The Dinosaur by Syd Hoff


Also check out

Dinosaurs in Love (feat. Tom Rosenthal)  by Fenn Rosenthal If you can watch that and not come down with a serious case of the feels, you have no heart.


For more on Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch by Kevin

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch one – Voltron: Defender of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch two – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch three – The Herculoids

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch four – Hong Kong Phooey

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch five – He-Man and the Masters of the Universe


More to come (live from what I remember about the 80’s!) as this story continues. 

Kevin Wadlow is 100% a real human being and definitely not a murder of crows wearing a person suit. He is an avid reader of horror, tabletop gamer, and drinker of coffee who enjoys drawing things of strangeness along the way. When the zombie apocalypse comes, he will probably be eaten first after saying something about how he fully expected to go out like this.

All Creatures Great and Small – A Homage and Reflections From a Fan

In 2005 I had the pleasure of speaking at the Annual Conference of the British and Irish Association of Law Libraries held in Harrogate, England. Located in North Yorkshire, Harrogate might be familiar to those of you who have watched the BBC program Last Tango in Halifax.  Harrogate is also where Agatha Christie was found when she mysteriously disappeared in 1926. And, yes, I did visit the hotel, now the Old Swan, where she was found.


More importantly for me, it is only a short drive from Harrogate to Thirsk, the home of James Herriot, author of All Creatures Great and Small. As a fan of both James Herriot’s books and the television show which premiered in 1978, this speaking commitment gave me the opportunity to engage in a bit of All Creatures Great and Small fandom.


So as PBS is set to air a remake of the 1978 show, I thought I’d share some photos and thoughts on my visit to Herriot Country.

A thirty-seven minute drive from Harrogate, Thirsk is a lovely market town in North Yorkshire and was the home of James Alfred Wight who wrote under the pseudonym James Herriot. While there, I visited the home and surgery (Skeldale House in the books) of this famous veterinarian.  And of course the experience would not be complete without some stereotypical English weather, as evidenced by my photos.  For me, the rain was no deterrent.


The World of James Herriot is a museum where fans can visit the Herriot home, view the sets used in the television adaptation of the books, and see Herriot Memorabilia.


Of course, I took full advantage of my visit to be the ultimate tourist, so here I am with one of the books’ most endearing characters, Mrs. Pumphrey (portrayed by the late Diana Rigg in the reboot), and her beloved Pekingese, Triki Woo.


On display to view (and at that time sit-in) is the 1934 Austin Seven Tourer used in the show’s opening credits.


While Dr. Herriot took care of a myriad of animals, from the smallest of kittens to the largest of cows, it was his veterinary partner, Siegfried Farnon, who had a love of horses. As luck would have it, on the day that I was visiting Thirsk, there happened to be races at the Thirsk Racecourse. As a proud lifelong Kentuckian, I of course headed to the races to place my bet, and to see how different a track in England might be as compared to our own Keeneland and Churchill Downs.


Perhaps right now, as the Pandemic has given us all a sense of weariness, James Herriot’s books, for me, bring to mind a time when things seemed simpler and kinder, and we moved at a slower pace. Of course, that may be looking at history through a rose-colored lens. Or, maybe because I currently do not have a pet, having seen my 20-year-old cat Gracie pass away in early December, I enjoy reading about the animals under the care of the veterinarians at Skeldale House.

If you too are already a fan of All Creatures Great and Small, I hope my trip to Herriot Country has inspired you to reread the books or to watch the series.  If you weren’t a fan before, I hope that I’ve brought you on board. Through Boone County Public Library, you can search the catalog to find the books and DVDs, as well as eBooks in our Digital Collection.

So, brew a cup of tea, grab a biscuit and sit back and enjoy the antics of James, Siegfried, and Tristan as they traipse across the Yorkshire Dales taking care of all creatures great and small.


In addition to the many options in BCPL’s collection, the PBS series premiere is Sunday, January 10, 2021 on Masterpiece. 


Amy Beckham Foster is the Scheben Branch Manager.  Prior to working at Boone County Public Library, she was a Law Librarian having most recently worked at the University of Kentucky College of Law Library. When not working, Amy loves to exercise, read and travel…especially to Great Britain. 

Challenge Accepted!

It’s January, which means resolution time!  My main resolution is to read more often and read a larger variety of books. Working at a library has helped, but I’m still not great about reading regularly. This year, I’m changing that by attempting one of the many reading challenges I found online. I’m beginning my challenge with the graphic novel adaptation of Octavia Butler’s Kindred  and will share what I’ve been reading with you monthly.

I’ve chosen the Popsugar Challenge (although there are a variety of challenges to choose from) for a few reasons:

  • Flexibility – I can use one book for multiple categories and don’t have to read a book a week to finish by the end of the year.
  • Variety – I tend to read murder mysteries and non-fiction. This forces me to branch out leading to something new!
  • Social (Facebook and Goodreads) – This will help with ideas for different categories since I’m unfamiliar with several of them.

I am fortunate to have access to our entire BCPL collection, as are you!  Plus I’ve purchased a few books over the years that I’ve never gotten around to reading. So I don’t think I will need to spend any additional money on this challenge!


BCPL can help you with your reading goals by providing access to materials.  Books are available via print, ebooks, and audiobooks. If you can’t access a book immediately, you can put it on hold and later modify the hold if you need to finish what you’re reading. The best part is that BCPL helps you avoid spending any extra money to accomplish your reading goals!

One of the Library’s greatest assets is staff. Each BCPL location (Main in Burlington, Scheben in Union, Hebron, Florence, Walton, and Chapin in Petersburg) has amazing staff available to help you find items outside of your regular reading routine. They can also offer suggestions for many of the different categories listed in any year-long reading challenge. Staff knows of the most popular or newest titles and can at least point you in the right direction for whatever category you may be looking for. If you don’t have time to stop in, fill out our Reading Recommendations form and our staff will provide suggested titles.

Maybe the challenge will inspire you to try reading something different this year! The goal of any reading challenge is always to complete it, but life happens. At least this is one New Year’s resolution you can pursue for free with resources from the Library.

As I mentioned, I’m beginning my challenge with the graphic novel adaptation of Octavia Butler’s Kindred.  I will share what I’ve been reading with you monthly and hope you will comment on your challenge or what you are reading.

Do you have any reading goals for 2021?


 

Kelsey Shackelford is the Community Events Liaison for Boone County Public Library.

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch five – He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

Do you remember waaaaaay back when having a day off meant Saturday, and Saturday meant waking up at the crack of dawn to plop yourself in front of the television set with a bowl of sugar based cereal substitute to watch Saturday morning cartoons? Yeah, me neither. But that’s okay. Let’s get NOSTALGIC

We’ve turned the temporal olielle generator to green. The metaplasmic thingnominator is set to 100%. Aberidus shields are at maximum drirathiel. It’s time to travel back to September 26, 1983 where we… oh wow. It looks like the world almost ended in flaming nuclear death? And it was a Monday? While I try to determine what happened with the timeline, I leave you with He-Man and the Masters of the Universe,” which aired for the first time on this date. 


History

“Beyond the farthest galaxies viewed by the greatest telescopes on Earth. Beyond the limits of our universe lies another place — a place of magic, myth, sorcery, and science.” Shocking exactly no one, the He-Man and the Masters of the Universe cartoon series was created to sell a line of children’s toys. Specifically, the show was intended to show kids how to play with the toys because (supposedly) it was difficult to tell the “bad” guys from the “good” guys. “Mattel began developing their Masters of the Universe line of toys in the late 1970s. The first action figures went on sale in 1981, but a year prior to that, Mattel approached Filmation to help them market the new toys.” The plot of the series gave the characters a backstory, and a place from which to carry out their adventures, that was based, at least in part, on classical literature and mythology, like Beowulf.  (Yeah, that’s right, Beowulf. You weren’t rotting your brain out watching cartoons. You were being exposed to the classics!)  


What I remember

By the power of Greyskull, I am…a consumer who will buy all the toys! What I remember the most about this show was the action figures, which makes sense given that the entire point of the show’s existence was product placement for Mattel. I know that I owned some sort of transparent robot character (cleverly named Roboto) and He-Man’s chest armor. (What happened to the rest of him? Who knows? I think I used it on a plastic brontosaurus instead. Because that’s the kid I was.) I also remember desperately wanting to be He-Man for Halloween back in kindergarten and, instead, being given a costume by my parents that consisted of a t-shirt with the sleeves cut off and an X drawn on the front. (It might make for a decent “file-not-found” costume now, but I was less than amused then. Ah kids… we’re all jerks who appreciate nothing.)


Rewatch

Season 1 Episode 1, “Diamond Ray of Disappearance” begins with Skeletor ordering Beastman to summon his Injustice League of Villains (Merman, Evil Lynn, Triclops, and Trap Jaw) so that he has an audience for the monologue of his latest evil plan: to expose the heroes of Eternia to a gem emitting some sort of energy that transports them to an alternate dimension. Meanwhile, the heroes of Eternia are having to sit through a magic show presided over by Orko, a creature that appears to be a cross between a Jawa from Star Wars and a hovering lampshade, and longing for a magic rock to make them disappear. Skeletor, being the warm, kind-hearted neighbor that he is, is only happy to assist. “He’s like Mr. Rogers without a face!” say the smiling local village children. (No one says this. It is made of lies.) 


Final verdict

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, like a lot of the cartoons from this time period, features a mixture of science-fiction and fantasy that’s never really explained and doesn’t need to be. If I had a handful of the toys based on this show… if I were watching a show based on a handful of toys…either way. If I had these toys, I wouldn’t worry about whether or not the robots could exist in the same place as people wielding swords, and He-Man and the Masters of the Universe doesn’t either. (In fact, I likely didn’t.) As a bonus, several of the female characters, such as Teela and the Sorceress of Castle Grayskull, are stated to be the most powerful representatives of their fields, making a show called “He-man” slightly progressive. 


If you liked He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe : a character guide and world compendium

Beowulf : a translation and commentary, together with Sellic Spell by Tolkein, J.R.R.

Grendel by John Gardner

Nico Bravo And The Hound Of Hades by Michael Cavallaro

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

Gideon The Ninth by Muir, Tamsyn

Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

The Last Smile in Sunder City by Luke Arnold


Also check out

Heyyeyaaeyaaaeyaeyaa (Fabulous Secret Powers) by SLACKCiRCUSCheck that out… there’s actually an extensive history behind the making of this video on its YouTube page. I just thought it was funny.

But not as funny as THIS: He-Man and Skeletor Dancing | Money Supermarket CommercialI have no idea what this commercial is intended to sell. I’m not even sure why it exists except that it obviously does. 


For more on Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch by Kevin

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch one – Voltron: Defender of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch two – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch three – The Herculoids

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch four – Hong Kong Phooey

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch six – Valley of the Dinosaurs


More to come (live from what I remember about the 80’s!) as this story continues. 

Kevin Wadlow is 100% a real human being and definitely not a murder of crows wearing a person suit. He is an avid reader of horror, tabletop gamer, and drinker of coffee who enjoys drawing things of strangeness along the way. When the zombie apocalypse comes, he will probably be eaten first after saying something about how he fully expected to go out like this.