Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch eight – Captain Cavemen and the Teen Angels

Do you remember waaaaaay back when having a day off meant Saturday, and Saturday meant waking up at the crack of dawn to plop yourself in front of the television set with a bowl of sugar based cereal substitute to watch Saturday morning cartoons? Yeah, me neither. But that’s okay. Let’s get NOSTALGIC!

That right there? Yep, it’s a velociraptor. Yep, it’s right behind you. You thought it was all fun and games living in a world where The Flintstones set the rules, didn’t you? No one ever considers the carnivores. Let’s carry on instead to September 10, 1977 where we’ll begin the story of a superhero who survived that alternate timeline. It’s a Saturday and airing for the first time is Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels.


History

Cavey was a caveman and a superhero and traveled with his own super squad of teenage mystery-solvers called the Teen Angels. Captain Caveman wasn’t the sharpest tool in the shed, so he kind of relied on the Teen Angels to accomplish pretty much anything and to stop him from eating potential clues.” Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels aired from September 10, 1977 to June 21, 1980 in addition to cameos on various incarnations of The Flintstones


What I remember

I do not remember Captain Caveman having his own show, let alone one called Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels. Is it like Charlie’s Angels? Are they an elite band of badass crime solving ladies in bell bottoms and high heeled shoes? Is he their Scooby Doo? No idea. Yet, I clearly remember the main character’s characteristic battle cry of “CAP-TAN CAAAAAVE MANNNN” so I’ve obviously seen something with him in it. Has time displaced my memory of our time displaced hero? Let’s find out.


Rewatch 

I was closer than I thought with making a “Scooby Doo” reference. Episode 1, “The Kooky Case of the Cryptic Keys”, checks off all the boxes for an episode of “Scooby Doo.” You’ve got meddling kids looking for clues in a spooky house. There’s obvious villains wearing masks and costumes. There’s one of those paintings where someone behind it can move a panel and see through its eyes. Even Captain Caveman himself is kind of like what would happen if you merged Scooby Doo with Shaggy and gave the resulting composite being a Swiss army club. The comparison isn’t a negative, in terms of enjoying watching the cartoon, but it might explain why I don’t recall watching it as a thing unto itself. 


Final verdict

If you like watching the wacky hijinks of crime solving sleuths, you’ll like “Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels.” It even has a little more racial diversity than “Scooby Doo.”


If you liked Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels 

Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels

Charlie’s Angels

Charlie’s Angels, Season 1-4

Meddling kids : a novel by Edgar Cantero

Who We Are And How We Got Here : Ancient DNA and The New Science Of The Human Past by David Reich

Sapiens : A Brief History Of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari


Also check out

Captain Caveman’s mahō shōjo (magical girl) transformation sequence 


For more on Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch by Kevin

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch one – Voltron: Defender of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch two – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch three – The Herculoids

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch four – Hong Kong Phooey

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch five – He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch six – Valley of the Dinosaurs

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch seven – Thundarr the Barbarian

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch nine – Clone High U.S.A.


More to come (live from what I remember about the 80’s!) as this story continues. 

Kevin Wadlow is 100% a real human being and definitely not a murder of crows wearing a person suit. He is an avid reader of horror, tabletop gamer, and drinker of coffee who enjoys drawing things of strangeness along the way. When the zombie apocalypse comes, he will probably be eaten first after saying something about how he fully expected to go out like this.

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch seven – Thundarr the Barbarian

Do you remember waaaaaay back when having a day off meant Saturday, and Saturday meant waking up at the crack of dawn to plop yourself in front of the television set with a bowl of sugar based cereal substitute to watch Saturday morning cartoons? Yeah, me neither. But that’s okay. Let’s get NOSTALGIC

Come with me now, through time and space, but mostly time, to October 4, 1980. I’m not quite 1 year old at this point in history, and as such, I won’t have a lot to say to you. No flash photography, please. If I go for your ankles, then you really shouldn’t have gotten so close to my cage. Crib. Did I say cage? I meant crib. It’s a Saturday and, on the television, you can find Thundarr the Barbarian.


History

Thundarr, an escaped slave with a laser sword, Ookla, the whatever a Mok is, and the Princess Ariel, a sorceress, travel the world of 3394 A.D. Earth, fighting against evil sorcerers, scientists, monsters, and robots.  Thundarr combines the sword and sorcery tropes of the fantasy genre with the robots and rayguns of the science-fiction genre through setting the story in a post-apocalyptic Earth where those things are commonplace. The 21 episode series was “[c]reated by Steve Gerber, the creator of Howard the Duck, and designed by Alex Toth, the designer of Space Ghost,” with the assistance of Jack Kirby, a massively influential individual in both Marvel and DC comics. Thundarr was short-lived, not because it lacked popularity, but because network executives wanted to promote cartoon versions of their live action programs, Mork & Mindy and Laverne & Shirley, in its time slot. *waves fist angrily at 1980s network executives* 


What I remember

I would have been all of… almost 2… when this show ended. My earliest memories start around age 3 (sneaking out to the living room where two of my older siblings were watching Poltergeist on tv, just in time to catch a glimpse of the scene where Carol Ann is sucked into the closet, soon followed by my being scarred for life) so this one was a bit ahead of my time. The first time I’d ever heard of Thundarr the Barbarian was as the inspiration for a role-playing game being crowdfunded on Kickstarter called Barbarians of the Ruined Earth. (Which I’ve been running for “Old School Gamers of Florence” since July of 2020.) 


Rewatch

“The year: 1994. From out of space comes a runaway planet, hurtling between the Earth and the Moon, unleashing cosmic destruction! Man’s civilization is cast in ruin! Two thousand years later, Earth is reborn. A strange new world rises from the old: a world of savagery, super science and sorcery.” Thundarr has one of the best opening sequences in all cartoon history. Not because it’s especially well animated (it’s not), but because of all the story possibilities it opens up. The first episode, “The Secret of the Black Pearl” begins with Thundarr, Ariel, and Ookla traveling through the woods at night to avoid being spotted by wizards. Their journey is cut short when Thundarr hears the cry of a human in peril. After freeing the captive of the Groundlings (rat people?), the group is tasked with the safe return of “the black pearl,”  an artifact stolen from the wizard Gemini, to Manhattan. More Groundlings are fought (“There can’t be more than fifty of them!”), the wizard Gemini is thwarted, and the fate of the human race under sorcerer rule is revealed. 


Final verdict

We actually carry Thundarr in our system! Check it out now. Right now. Stop reading and go put it on reserve. I can wait. I can also check to see if you did it. (I won’t. But I could. I’m not. But go reserve it just in case I did.) Definitely keep in mind when this series first aired because one thing you’re not going to see in Thundarr is any hint of diversity or inclusion, and the female lead character tends to get captured a lot, and even when she isn’t in danger, her spells are largely sparkly bubbles. 


If you liked Thundarr the Barbarian

Thundarr the Barbarian – the complete series

Mad Max

Mad Max: Fury Road

Conan the barbarian

The coming of Conan the Cimmerian

John Carter of Mars : the first five novels

Tarzan of the apes

Last Kids on Earth series


Also check out

My Secret Origin by Ookla the Mok


For more on Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch by Kevin

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch one – Voltron: Defender of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch two – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch three – The Herculoids

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch four – Hong Kong Phooey

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch five – He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch six – Valley of the Dinosaurs

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch eight – Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch nine – Clone High U.S.A.


More to come (live from what I remember about the 80’s!) as this story continues. 

Kevin Wadlow is 100% a real human being and definitely not a murder of crows wearing a person suit. He is an avid reader of horror, tabletop gamer, and drinker of coffee who enjoys drawing things of strangeness along the way. When the zombie apocalypse comes, he will probably be eaten first after saying something about how he fully expected to go out like this.

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch six – Valley of the Dinosaurs

Do you remember waaaaaay back when having a day off meant Saturday, and Saturday meant waking up at the crack of dawn to plop yourself in front of the television set with a bowl of sugar based cereal substitute to watch Saturday morning cartoons? Yeah, me neither. But that’s okay. Let’s get NOSTALGIC

Ah childhood memories. Do you remember that time, on September 7, 1974, when your parents chose to take you on vacation to the jungles of South America instead of something normal, like Disneyland? And how, while white water rafting, a whirlpool sucked your canoe into an inter-dimensional vortex? Good times. You could have stayed home and watched, for the first time, Valley of the Dinosaurs.


History

Valley of the Dinosaurs was one of three similar shows airing in 1974 that involved a modern family interacting with prehistoric humans and dinosaurs, the other two being Land of the Lost and Korg: 70,000 B.C. The cartoon, produced by Hanna-Barbera, ran for 16 episodes from September 7, 1974 to September 4, 1976 and featured the Butler family being sucked into a whirlpool while traversing the rapids in South America only to emerge either “back in time” or “in a parallel fantasy world.” Valley of the Dinosaurs was a “laudatory example of melding entertainment with education” “[without] bombarding the viewer with ‘message’ dialogue or prosocial propaganda.” In other words, a show featuring dinosaurs, early humans, and modern humans all living in the same time period is intended to teach me something. I go into this with some skepticism. 


What I remember

I consider myself something of a connoisseur of cartoons, if not an actual expert, but I can honestly say I’d never heard of Valley of the Dinosaurs prior to doing a search for cartoons that first aired in the 70s-80s, meaning that they would have been age appropriate for my childhood cartoon binging – which is entirely different from my adult cartoon binging.  (Ok… it’s not any different. I can admit that. Happy?)


Rewatch

I think Episode 1 is trying to teach me that if I am ever chased into a cave by a brontosaurus, because one of my traveling companions has violated a local taboo about leaving a variety of fruit for the sole consumption of said brontosaurus, leading to a cave in and rising water levels from an underground spring, I can use bamboo to channel that water through a hole in the ceiling of the cave using basic physics. I also learned the properties of a lever and how to use that lever to create an avalanche to drive away the hangry brontosaurus so that my companions can escape. (Cue: *the more you know*)


Final verdict

Valley of the Dinosaurs reminds me of the Edgar Rice BurroughsPellucidar series where a miner and an inventor use an “iron mole” to drill down into “a world that time forgot” inside of the hollow Earth. Swap out the miner and the inventor for your standard sitcom family, add a couple of pets, a dog and a stegosaurus, for comic relief, and you have Valley of the Dinosaurs. That being said, it’s highly unlikely that most people, unlike myself, will be reminded of a series whose first book was published in 1914. You’ll also have to shut your brain off for the way the “cave people” speak perfect, if stilted, English. It’s like watching the dreadful representations of Native Americans in old Westerns, except that the “cave people” in Valley of the Dinosaurs are basically blue-eyed and Caucasian. 


If you liked Valley of the Dinosaurs

Valley of the Dinosaurs

Land of the Lost

Land of the Lost, the complete series, season three.

Jurassic Park

Dinotopia : a land apart from time by Gurney, James

The Rise And Fall Of The Dinosaurs : A New History Of A Lost World by Stephen Brusatte

Nature’s giants : the biology and evolution of the world’s largest lifeforms by Graeme D. Ruxton

Danny And The Dinosaur by Syd Hoff


Also check out

Dinosaurs in Love (feat. Tom Rosenthal)  by Fenn Rosenthal If you can watch that and not come down with a serious case of the feels, you have no heart.


For more on Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch by Kevin

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch one – Voltron: Defender of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch two – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch three – The Herculoids

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch four – Hong Kong Phooey

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch five – He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch seven – Thundarr the Barbarian

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch eight – Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch nine – Clone High U.S.A.


More to come (live from what I remember about the 80’s!) as this story continues. 

Kevin Wadlow is 100% a real human being and definitely not a murder of crows wearing a person suit. He is an avid reader of horror, tabletop gamer, and drinker of coffee who enjoys drawing things of strangeness along the way. When the zombie apocalypse comes, he will probably be eaten first after saying something about how he fully expected to go out like this.

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch five – He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

Do you remember waaaaaay back when having a day off meant Saturday, and Saturday meant waking up at the crack of dawn to plop yourself in front of the television set with a bowl of sugar based cereal substitute to watch Saturday morning cartoons? Yeah, me neither. But that’s okay. Let’s get NOSTALGIC

We’ve turned the temporal olielle generator to green. The metaplasmic thingnominator is set to 100%. Aberidus shields are at maximum drirathiel. It’s time to travel back to September 26, 1983 where we… oh wow. It looks like the world almost ended in flaming nuclear death? And it was a Monday? While I try to determine what happened with the timeline, I leave you with He-Man and the Masters of the Universe,” which aired for the first time on this date. 


History

“Beyond the farthest galaxies viewed by the greatest telescopes on Earth. Beyond the limits of our universe lies another place — a place of magic, myth, sorcery, and science.” Shocking exactly no one, the He-Man and the Masters of the Universe cartoon series was created to sell a line of children’s toys. Specifically, the show was intended to show kids how to play with the toys because (supposedly) it was difficult to tell the “bad” guys from the “good” guys. “Mattel began developing their Masters of the Universe line of toys in the late 1970s. The first action figures went on sale in 1981, but a year prior to that, Mattel approached Filmation to help them market the new toys.” The plot of the series gave the characters a backstory, and a place from which to carry out their adventures, that was based, at least in part, on classical literature and mythology, like Beowulf.  (Yeah, that’s right, Beowulf. You weren’t rotting your brain out watching cartoons. You were being exposed to the classics!)  


What I remember

By the power of Greyskull, I am…a consumer who will buy all the toys! What I remember the most about this show was the action figures, which makes sense given that the entire point of the show’s existence was product placement for Mattel. I know that I owned some sort of transparent robot character (cleverly named Roboto) and He-Man’s chest armor. (What happened to the rest of him? Who knows? I think I used it on a plastic brontosaurus instead. Because that’s the kid I was.) I also remember desperately wanting to be He-Man for Halloween back in kindergarten and, instead, being given a costume by my parents that consisted of a t-shirt with the sleeves cut off and an X drawn on the front. (It might make for a decent “file-not-found” costume now, but I was less than amused then. Ah kids… we’re all jerks who appreciate nothing.)


Rewatch

Season 1 Episode 1, “Diamond Ray of Disappearance” begins with Skeletor ordering Beastman to summon his Injustice League of Villains (Merman, Evil Lynn, Triclops, and Trap Jaw) so that he has an audience for the monologue of his latest evil plan: to expose the heroes of Eternia to a gem emitting some sort of energy that transports them to an alternate dimension. Meanwhile, the heroes of Eternia are having to sit through a magic show presided over by Orko, a creature that appears to be a cross between a Jawa from Star Wars and a hovering lampshade, and longing for a magic rock to make them disappear. Skeletor, being the warm, kind-hearted neighbor that he is, is only happy to assist. “He’s like Mr. Rogers without a face!” say the smiling local village children. (No one says this. It is made of lies.) 


Final verdict

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, like a lot of the cartoons from this time period, features a mixture of science-fiction and fantasy that’s never really explained and doesn’t need to be. If I had a handful of the toys based on this show… if I were watching a show based on a handful of toys…either way. If I had these toys, I wouldn’t worry about whether or not the robots could exist in the same place as people wielding swords, and He-Man and the Masters of the Universe doesn’t either. (In fact, I likely didn’t.) As a bonus, several of the female characters, such as Teela and the Sorceress of Castle Grayskull, are stated to be the most powerful representatives of their fields, making a show called “He-man” slightly progressive. 


If you liked He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

He-Man and the Masters of the Universe : a character guide and world compendium

Beowulf : a translation and commentary, together with Sellic Spell by Tolkein, J.R.R.

Grendel by John Gardner

Nico Bravo And The Hound Of Hades by Michael Cavallaro

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

Gideon The Ninth by Muir, Tamsyn

Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir

The Last Smile in Sunder City by Luke Arnold


Also check out

Heyyeyaaeyaaaeyaeyaa (Fabulous Secret Powers) by SLACKCiRCUSCheck that out… there’s actually an extensive history behind the making of this video on its YouTube page. I just thought it was funny.

But not as funny as THIS: He-Man and Skeletor Dancing | Money Supermarket CommercialI have no idea what this commercial is intended to sell. I’m not even sure why it exists except that it obviously does. 


For more on Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch by Kevin

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch one – Voltron: Defender of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch two – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch three – The Herculoids

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch four – Hong Kong Phooey

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch six – Valley of the Dinosaurs

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch seven – Thundarr the Barbarian

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch eight – Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch nine – Clone High U.S.A.


More to come (live from what I remember about the 80’s!) as this story continues. 

Kevin Wadlow is 100% a real human being and definitely not a murder of crows wearing a person suit. He is an avid reader of horror, tabletop gamer, and drinker of coffee who enjoys drawing things of strangeness along the way. When the zombie apocalypse comes, he will probably be eaten first after saying something about how he fully expected to go out like this.

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch four – Hong Kong Phooey

Do you remember waaaaaay back when having a day off meant Saturday, and Saturday meant waking up at the crack of dawn to plop yourself in front of the television set with a bowl of sugar based cereal substitute to watch Saturday morning cartoons? Yeah, me neither. But that’s okay. Let’s get NOSTALGIC

Let’s go back to September 7, 1974. If you were born on this date: You’ve slept for 5,620 days or 15 years! Wow… I mean sometimes it’s fun to play with statistics but think about that. FIFTEEN of your FORTY-SIX years of life have been spent sleeping? That’s exhausting to even contemplate. So let’s not. If you were watching television on this date instead, you might have seen the first airing of Hong Kong Phooey


History

Hong Kong Phooey was a “spoof of live-action detective shows (not a spoof of Kung Fu, as has sometimes been suggested)” that was produced by Hanna-Barbera and ran for 16 episodes between September 7 and December 21, 1974. It featured the antics of mild mannered, but not overly bright, janitor Penrod Pooch and his feline side-kick, Spot, fighting crime with the aid of a different selection from “The Hong Kong Kung Fu Book of Tricks” and his shapeshifting pagoda mobile each episode. Hey! Scatman Crothers is the voice of Hong Kong Phooey! Evidently, Scatman Crothers did a lot of voice acting for cartoons, including Scooby-Doo, The Transformers, and The Aristocats


What I remember

I don’t remember watching individual episodes of Hong Kong Phooey as a kid, but I do recall the character being a part of a larger show that made a sort of shared universe out of other Hanna-Barbera cartoons. (It might have been Laff-A-Lympics.) I also remember there being a fairly catchy theme song. I’m at least halfway certain that some of the memories I have of watching Hong Kong Phooey should be attributed to having watched Underdog instead. 


Rewatch

The first episode, “Car Thieves/ Zoo Story,” has Penry transforming himself into Hong Kong Phooey with the aid of a file cabinet, a cat named Spot, and a quick once over of an instruction manual in order to stop a gang of car thieves. Specifically, he stops the car thieves after he assists one of them with stealing a car when he falls for their clever little-old-lady disguise. More specific than that, Hong Kong Phooey bumbles around until the thieves end up trapping themselves in red paint. In short, he’s not a particularly great martial artist, but the thieves don’t really require one to thwart them.


Final verdict

Honestly, one thing that I anticipated with a modern rewatch of something called Hong Kong Phooey was racial insensitivity. And yes, there’s some. The main character, Penrod “Penry” Pooch, gets his martial arts training from reading the “Hong Kong School of Kung Foo” manual. He also drives a pagoda. If you can look past those for the sake of watching cartoons, you can watch Hong Kong Phooey.


If you liked Hong Kong Phooey

Hong Kong Phooey – The Complete Series

Kung fu panda

Kung fu panda 2

Kung fu panda 3

Kung fu hustle

Kung fu – Seasons 1-3


Also check out

Old School by Danger Doom 


For more on Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch by Kevin

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch one – Voltron: Defender of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch two – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch three – The Herculoids

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch five – He-Man and the Masters of the Universe

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch six – Valley of the Dinosaurs

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch seven – Thundarr the Barbarian

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch eight – Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels

Saturday Morning Cartoon Rewatch nine – Clone High U.S.A.


More to come (live from what I remember about the 80’s!) as this story continues. 

Kevin Wadlow is 100% a real human being and definitely not a murder of crows wearing a person suit. He is an avid reader of horror, tabletop gamer, and drinker of coffee who enjoys drawing things of strangeness along the way. When the zombie apocalypse comes, he will probably be eaten first after saying something about how he fully expected to go out like this.